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To-do list, Dec. 11

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THURSDAY 12/11

 

UALR PERCUSSION BAND ENSEMBLE

7:30 p.m., University Theatre, UALR. Free.

 

Here's a sure-fire way to get young folks interested in a University band — bring Radiohead into the mix. Following on the heels of a popular take on Pink Floyd's “Dark Side of the Moon,” the UALR Percussion Ensemble takes on Oxford's finest. It's not exactly new ground: Several years back, YouTube footage of the University of Arizona marching band doing a medley of Radiohead songs made the rounds online, and the UMass Percussion Ensemble's cover of “Paranoid Android” was a go-to mixtape track in 2004. Thursday's performance, which will include songs like “15 Step,” “I Might Be Wrong” and “Kid A,” features an array of instruments — bass, bells, chimes, a drum set, marimbas, tympani, vibraphones. Radiohead's oddball use of percussion, full of strange blips and stuttering beats, is sure to make for a compelling show. The UALR Trojan Pep Band also performs. Catch a preview video of the percussion ensemble doing “Kid A” on Rock Candy. LM

 

 

FRIDAY 12/12

 

JOE BUCK

10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

 

Every time the haunting visage of Joe Buck enters my fragile mind, I remember seeking fatherly advice on how to handle taunting playground commands such as “go to hell.” He said, “Son, tell 'em if you don't see 'em there, you'll know there's a worse place.” Perhaps the one-man hellbilly music machine Joe Buck would even agree with Dad on this one. A solid presence with Hank III's projects and the bassist/drummer/guitarist on Th' Legendary Shack Shaker's 2003 debut, “Cockadoodledon't,” Buck, performing one-man band-style as Joe Buck Yourself, headlines what could easily become a demon-conjuring three-act show. He'll be thoroughly supported by old-school garage miscreants Bloodless Cooties, as well as Josh's the Devil's latest incarnation, Devil's Right Hand Band, featuring guitarist Mark Wyers (Weisenheimers), and yours truly on drums. So if the cosmos doesn't maintain steady alignment, strange rumblings may likely open the portal south of heaven and summon the White Water Tavern, and all its occupants, directly onto the elevator to hell. See you there? PP.

 

 

ARKANSAS CHAMBER SINGERS

7:30 p.m., St. Mark's Episcopal Church. $10-$15.

 

On the eve of its 30th anniversary, the Arkansas Chamber Singers unveil a special commissioned piece. From renowned composer Stephen Paulus, who The New Yorker has called “... a bright, fluent inventor with a ready lyric gift,” comes the world premiere of “Christmas Dances,” a work written for harp, flute and chorus. The Chamber Singers are billing this holiday-themed concert “Tomorrow Will Be My Dancing Day,” and they'll sing that famous carol as well as selections from Herbert Howells and Tchaikovsky's “Nutcracker Suite.” Dancers from the Arkansas Festival Ballet, harpist Elizabeth Chardonnet and flutist Carolyn Brown accompany the singers. There's an encore performance, same place, same time, on Sunday. LM.

 

 

SATURDAY 12/13

 

REVEREND HORTON HEAT

8 p.m., the Village. $20 adv., $25 d.o.s.

 

? I first heard of the Reverend when a buddy told me that during a Texas stop on the 1992 Lollapalooza tour, Ministry's Al Jourgensen wandered into a bar and was so awestruck by the performer that, without a word, he approached the stage, leaned over and began grooming Heat's boots — with his tongue. Whether this is hard fact or hee-haw gossip, the indisputable truth is that for nearly two decades, Texan hell-raiser Jim Heath, known far and wide as Reverend Horton Heat, has been one of the driving forces of boozy psycho-rockabilly. (The title Reverend was bestowed upon him by a Dallas bar owner because, he said, his music was “gospel.”) Eventually, by 1994, Heat found himself laying down tracks in the studio with kindred spirit Jourgensen. Never going out of style, his recognition and appeal continue to grow, thanks to signature country-flavored punkabilly and onstage antics. This has brought him and his band a strikingly diverse fan base, a devoted cult following and the respect of fellow musicians worldwide. PP.

 

 

DUB TRIO

9:30 p.m., Juanita's. $7.

 

It's not a combination you hear every day. Dub Trio mixes noise metal with dub. That is, discordant rock with studio knob twiddling to emphasis bass and drums and often add echo and reverb. The largely instrumental band grew from Actual Proof, a drum-and-bass-ish band of Berklee College of Music grads. It's members — DP Holmes (guitar, keyboards), Stu Brooks (bass, keyboards) and Joe Tomino (drums, melodica) — have long been in demand as session players in hip-hop, lending their chops to everyone from Common to Tupac. That shines through in spots. A song on the band's latest, “Another Sound,” finds the trio recreating legendary producer J. Dilla's kick-snare patterns. But more often than not, Dub Trio goes hard, with sludgy, distortion-laced rock a la the Melvins, and then, with nary a warning, the group gets all King Tubby, slowing the music down to a stony, bass-heavy creep. It's music to thrash and sway to. From Denton, Oso Closo play pop-rock built on nimble, jazz-inflected guitar work (by, in part, a lady named Lindsey Miller). They open along with Conway's the Rollin' Jack Dandies, who used to go by Modal Wayward. The concert is open to ages 18 and older. LM.

 

ALL NIGHT DRUG PROWLING WOLVES

9 p.m., White Water. $5.

 

It's a reunion. Lloyd Benjamin, who grew up here and played in at least a half dozen great Little Rock bands before moving to Atlanta to open the trendy Get This! art gallery, returns to town with his band, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves. He's joined on the bill with longtime homies Alan Disaster and Jeremy Brasher and their locally beloved bands, Smoke Up Johnny and the Moving Front, respectively. Way back when, they all lived together in “the Mansion,” the white house on the corner of Third and Pulaski that was, for years, the punk house in Little Rock. Formed out of the ashes of beloved ATL act the Rent Boys, All Night Drug Prowling Wolves come to White Water behind a just released self-titled LP. True to their Clash-lyric-inspired name, the band makes hook-heavy post punk with a bite. If memory serves, live, they all get sweaty and thrash around a lot. LM

 

 

TUESDAY 12/16

 

HANA PESTLE

WITH BEN MOODY

9 p.m., Juanita's. $8.

 

You'll recognize that second name. The Little Rock native co-founded Evanescence and stuck through most of its meteoric rise, before going his own way to write and produce for the likes of Kelly Clarkson, Celine Dion, Avril Lavigne and Lindsay Lohan. For the last several years, Moody's been working with Pestle, a 19-year-old Billings, Mont., native, who, in a goth-y black dress, looks an awful lot like a certain someone from Moody's past. She's got big pipes, too, which she shows off on her wide-ranging debut EP. There's the epic rocker one might expect from a Moody protege, but also an acoustic anthem that's probably bound to underpin some dramatic moment on “The Hills” and an impressive cover of Leonard Cohen's mournful “Hallelujah.” This could be an early preview of someone you'll be hearing on the radio in the near future. And maybe Moody, who's long, long been on the verge of releasing his solo debut, will preview some of his own songs. The show's open to ages 18 and older. This is sure to be a hot ticket. LM

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