Entertainment » In the Clubs

Thaw out this weekend at White Water

Fat Tuesday shenanigans and hijinks abound.

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AT JUANITA'S: Good Fear.
  • AT JUANITA'S: Good Fear.

On the group’s myspace weblog account, Fayetteville alt-pop-rock band The Good Fear — appearing with American Princes at White Water Tavern on Saturday, Feb. 25 — lists an impressive group of band relations, with members, former and current, in Lucero, All American Rejects, the Paper Hearts, Skirt, the New Amsterdams, Shake Ray Turbine, William Martyr 17, Woods Afire and Fulton.

Collins Kilgore and Matt Quin of American Princes told us they rock, so we gave a listen to a couple of The Good Fear downloads from the band’s latest album, “Keep in Touch” (independently produced and available at Anthro-Pop in Little Rock or Clunk in Fayetteville). The Good Fear has a muddy-indie rock sound, with — uh huh — a lap steel guitar featured. The standout in the band’s EP was “The Way You Were.” The group’s members are Zach Holland, Tim Campbell, Bryan Brown, Dustin Bartholomew, Jason Rich (on lap steel) and Todd Gill.

They’re on a two-date stint with the American Princes, in Fayetteville on Friday, Feb. 24, for a 9 p.m. show at Sodies, then at the White Water on Saturday for a 10 p.m. show. Saturday’s cover charge is $5.
Former Kings of England lead man Roger Barrett has formed a band called Blood Eagle, which will also play at Sodies on the Square on Friday.



And yet more Fayetteville news: One of the hottest bands in Northwest Arkansas is led by Sarah Hughes, who will be part of a show with the Django Walker Band on Friday, Feb. 24, at Sticky Fingerz.

Hughes has drawn comparisons to Bonnie Raitt and Janis Joplin. Walker, meanwhile, is the son of Jerry Jeff Walker and has co-written songs with Texas country music sensation Pat Green. Walker’s young career has been highlighted by sharing the stage with the Dixie Chicks in a huge country show at Dallas’ Cotton Bowl, and he’s got a second album now in the works with his independent label, Lazy Kid Music.

Showtime is 9:30 p.m. and admission is $6.



For those who play nice: Though one wouldn’t call her a Christian act, acoustic/folk performer Christine Kane will be in concert at the Grace Presbyterian Church on Sunday, Feb. 26. Kane is well known on the singer-songwriter circuit, with spiritually fresh lyrics. She’s touring in celebration of her new album, “Right Outta Here,” the fifth release on her own record label.

Admission is $15 for the 7 p.m. show.



Tart, poppy, fueled with driving keys but most importantly sincere, The Honorary Title will headline a 9 p.m. show at Juanita’s Cantina Ballroom on Saturday, Feb. 25.

The Brooklyn, N.Y., quintet has been through here before, and those who like the smart rock of Elvis Costello or Lower East Side geniuses like the late Jeff Buckley will be able to draw obvious comparisons. The pop-rock group, powered by synthesizer and keys, has an intelligently rebellious, slightly acidic sense of humor combined with bopping, touch-and-go, 90-to-nothing delivery.

James Gorbel, who supplies intense vocals — moving from soft feathery whispers to intense emissions that could rival that of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins -– is the band’s main songwriter, and goes further in his way of sharing personal demons. But the music also can be fun and is as accessible as it is danceable. “Anything Else But the Truth” is the band’s latest CD. In addition to Gorbel, members include Aaron Kanstra (keys), Adam Boyd (drums) and John Wiley (guitar).

Tour mate band Limbeck, which is influenced by the Replacements, the Beach Boys, Big Star and Wilco, is part of the lineup along with Koufax and Memphis-based Cory Branan and the Junior Varsity Band.

It should be a big show and is open to all ages — we’re betting more than just a few Gen Y-ers show up. Admission the day of the show is $12.



Acoustic Sounds Cafe shows a hand with two pair this Friday: Dave Coe and Frances Cunningham headline with Cathy Barton and Dave Para opening at 7:30 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church.

Coe, who spent most of his career in bluegrass and country bands and played 20-plus years with Michael Martin Murphey, took up Irish music in the early 1990s. It was in an Irish band called the Rogues that Coe, a fiddler, met bouzouki player Cunningham, and they became a duo focusing on old-time Appalachian music.

Barton and Para use guitar, banjo and hammered dulcimer in their Ozarks-flavored music.

Admission is $10. The cafe is at 600 Pleasant Valley Drive.



Several clubs/music venues has live music and revelry planned for Fat Tuesday, Feb. 28:

• The Oyster Bar have a double bill with the Bug Tussle Boys and the Munks (semifinal winner in week two of the Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase) starting at 7:30 p.m. The Munks will also be featured on “Good Morning, Arkansas” on Friday, Feb. 24. According to Stephen Koch of the Bug Tussle Boys, both bands have albums forthcoming in the spring.

• The Afterthought has scheduled local jazz/blues act Lagniappe for 8 p.m. If you need a smoke during the show you’ll need to step outside; the event will be smoke-free. Admission is $6.

• Sticky Fingerz will jam with Weakness for Blondes at 9 p.m. Admission is $5.

• Arguably the most authentic way to celebrate the day before Lent begins is with Dikki Du and the Zydeco Crew, bringing blingy accordion and Cajun-style high energy to Cajun’s Wharf on Tuesday. Admission is $5 for the 8:30 p.m. show.

Preceding the music, KABZ-FM, 103.7 “The Buzz” will sponsor Cajun’s annual celebrity crawfish eating contest, featuring radio, TV and maybe even newspaper personalities. Dominated for years by former KARK-TV news anchor Denise Whitaker, who has left the market for Seattle, the contest should be wide open this Fat Tuesday.

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