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Justice is served

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State Sen. Bruce Holland, R-Greenwood, sought a Republican-style compromise with the legal system, but didn't get it. There may be a lesson here for the legislative and executive branches.

Holland sought a government entitlement to drive as fast as ever he wanted on the state's highways. He'd promised a fight to the end against charges of fleeing, careless driving and improper passing, all arising from an incident in January 2011, in which the senator fled from a Perry County deputy sheriff at speeds of more than 100 mph, passing terrified fellow motorists en route.

Apparently someone of sounder judgment counseled Holland about the separation of powers, because he showed up in circuit court the other day and pled "no contest" (a weaselly way of pleading guilty) to all charges. He read a statement of apology and was fined $890 and ordered to perform 80 hours of community service. (Under supervision, preferably. Serving others will be an unfamiliar role for Holland.) A perhaps over-confident prosecuting attorney surmised that Holland had learned his lesson.

Possibly so, but we hope the judge told the senator "I don't want to see you in here again." Many would rather not see the reactionary Holland in the Senate chamber either, but only voters can impose that sentence.

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