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Bring the cauliflower too

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What is the sound of one brussel sprouting?

"From Janice Hough of leftcoastsportsbabe.com:

"For a number of Jets fans, isn't NY releasing Mark Sanchez and signing Michael Vick like your mom saying you don't have to eat the broccoli but she'll replace it with brussel sprouts?"

I'd always assumed those little cabbagey things were named for the capital of Belgium and were therefore correctly referred to as Brussels sprouts. But I see on the Internet that large numbers of people do what this writer did, omit the final –s and make the –B lower-case.

An authoritative-sounding online source, Grammarist, says confidently that the plant was named for the city, even though some publications choose not to use the capital B. Dropping the final s is "a common misspelling," Grammarist says. Merriam-Webster uses brussels sprout. On the fence, Wikipedia says that "The Brussels sprout has long been popular in Brussels, Belgium, and may have originated there."

I attended a dinner recently at which leftcoastsportsbabe's imaginings actually occurred. After an announcement by the master of ceremonies, the broccoli on the menu was replaced by Brussels sprouts. The change produced a kind of confused growling from the guests.

I'm among the small group that likes both broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Certainly better than I like Michael Vick.

Ingrid Bergman was no iceberg:

"Corruption of the judiciary: [Judge] Maggio the tip of the iceburg"

Guy Lancaster, editor of the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture, writes: "Of course that is supposed to be iceberg, coming to us from Scandinavian languages and meaning 'mountain.' Burg, of course, also has an origin in Germanic languages, but it means 'town' or 'village.' Interestingly, I've been studying Swedish for a few years now, and the final g in berg is pronounced with almost the same sound an ending y makes in English. Ingmar Bergman , therefore, is more correctly pronounced as Ingmar Berryman. I've not done any digging to see if our English surname Berryman comes from Bergman, but I bet it does."

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