Abject Lessons: Why I don’t unfriend or block folks on Facebook | Street Jazz

Abject Lessons: Why I don’t unfriend or block folks on Facebook

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Almost every week I am asked why I don’t unfriend certain folks on Facebook, those who flirt with bigotry, drop cliches or insults at the drop of a hat, or become surly whenever a woman happens to disagree with their world view. There is a reason I don’t delete them from my list of friends, but it has little to do with freedom of expression, or First Amendment rights.

No, the reason that that I don’t disassociate myself from such folks is that they serve as an abject lesson of what can happen to a person when they becomes so consumed with contempt and scorn for half of the human race that one that can practically feel their psychic emanations coming through the screen, their angry bristling as they demonstrate, once again, their apparent belief that respect for the views of others only applies to those they agree with.

This applies to liberals who bash men and women of faith as much as it does to those for whom the word “libtard” is the height of eloquence.

A pox on both their houses.

But why not just remove them from my list of Facebook friends, and thus assure that everyone’s day is more pleasant, as a result?

Because I think it is important to realize that such people exist in the world, to understand (as much as possible) their line of reasoning, and to be able to counter such, even when they can only express themselves through cliche and schoolyard insults.

And ultimately, I suppose, because I believe in the power of redemption, that with passion and eloquence one can change the mind of another.

I can understand why others may choose to block or unfriend such Lost Souls. For my part, however, I like to think that they can still be brought around, or at least learn to behave like grown-ups they purport to be.

All things are possible . . .

******

Today’s Soundtrack

Blogging on the roof today, while listening to the original Broadway cast recording of “Fiddler on the Roof,” featuring the wondrous Zero Mostel.

To life, to life, L'chaim!

*****

Quote of the Day

The moment comes when a character does or says something you hadn't thought about. At that moment he's alive and you leave it to him. - writer Graham Greene

rsdrake@cox.net




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