News Round-up | Shale Watch

News Round-up

by

2 comments

I've been a little overwhelmed recently - what with the big news about how all "landfarms" in the state were found to be out of compliance with state environmental regulations, complaints and concerns from citizens in Arkansas (mainly about noise), and reports about drilling mud being dumped into landfills - that I simply have not had the time to devote to this blog that I would like. 

In the interest of killing a lot of birds with one stone, here's a round-up of some items that are worth mentioning:

More Fallout: Fines handed down as a result of the ADEQ report on "landfarms."

Don't Drink the Water: PBS Frontline special on a growing water crisis.  "In Poisoned Waters, [Hendrick] Smith speaks with researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who report finding genetically mutated marine life in the Potomac River. In addition to finding frogs with six legs and other mutations, the researchers have found male amphibians with ovaries and female frogs with male genitalia. Scientists tell FRONTLINE that the mutations are likely caused by exposure to 'endocrine disruptors,' chemical compounds that mimic the body's natural hormones." 

It's important to remember that the oil and gas industry has some pretty broad exemptions from federal regs like the Safe Drinking Water Act.  There's also a link between endocrine disruptors and natural gas drilling.  Rod Bryan, of the Arkansas Conservation Alliance, stopped by a conference call in Fayetteville this weekend with Dr. Theo Colburn of the Endocrine Disruption Exchange to talk about the possible adverse health effects that result from drilling.  See Rod's YouTube video of the Power Point and conference call. 

Cleaning Up:  In a move that we've talked about here, the city of Clinton will begin recycling water used in natural gas drilling operations.  Each fracking job takes anywhere from 3 to 5 million gallons of water and that's probably a conservative estimate. 

Don't Drink the Water IIThis from Pro Publica, a great investigative journalism outlet that has been working on natural gas drilling stories from the beginning, on the effect drilling has had on drinking water in three states.  We could be next. 

Stanky Stanky:  Allied Waste Industries respond to complaints about a strong diesel-like smell coming from the landfill.  Turns out they've been dumping drilling waste.  They'll stop now, due to the actions of some concerned citizens in the area.  Max has more

From the ArkTimes store

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment
 

Add a comment

Clicky